The Lyman Allyn Art Museum Reinstalls Beloved Hawthorne Doll House

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
THE LYMAN ALLYN ART MUSEUM REINSTALLS BELOVED HAWTHORNE DOLL HOUSE

November 6, 2014
Lyman Allyn Art Museum
Press Contact: Rebecca Marsie, Communications Coordinator
860.443.2545 x112 / marsie@lymanallyn.org

Hawthorne Doll HouseNew London – The Lyman Allyn Art Museum is delighted to announce that the beloved Victorian Hawthorne Doll House, a favorite of generations of visitors to the Lyman Allyn, has been moved to its original location on the lower level of the Museum. The 15’ Doll House has long been part of the Lyman Allyn’s collection and is remembered fondly by many members of the New London and Southeastern community as a highlight of their youthful Museum visits. Back in its “new” setting, it is accessible, looks fantastic and is much more family-friendly than ever.

Built for the Lyman Allyn Art Museum in 1962 by Harold Hawthorne, the American Victorian Dollhouse was designed to house part of the museum’s toy collection donated by Lydia Sachs Baratz. The exterior of the dollhouse was designed to reflect the Victorian tastes of its doll inhabitants with a mansard roof, dormer windows, and a widow’s walk encircling two chimneys.  Three levels of the home’s interior are visible, complete with bedrooms, a dining room, a nursery, a sewing room, and two kitchens which showcase the extensive kitchen miniatures in the Baratz Collection.

[Read more…]

Enhancing Landscape to Promote Butterflies

butterflytalk

Wednesday,  December 10

Reception: 5PM
Presentation: 6PM

Please join us to hear Charles Boos, Certified Arborist and UCONN Master Gardener, as he talks about the increasingly crucial role our landscape plants play in supporting local populations of butterflies. Organized in conjunction with “Catch the Butterflies” an installation by artist Brian Keith Stephens, this talk will illuminate how increasing urbanization has led to a highly fragmented and diminished habitat for butterflies and other insect wildlife.

Charles will highlight some of the plant species we can plant to help feed and provide cover for our native wildlife in our increasingly suburban habitat. He will also point out some of the worst invasive plant offenders in our home landscapes and will show how to replace them with species that are native, that support our native wildlife, and that also enhance the landscape.

Charles Boos has a long history in habitat enhancement in New London, New York, and Rhode Island. In addition to helping homeowners transition their suburban landscapes to more sustainable, wildlife friendly landscapes, he has worked on several large restorations in conjunction with the Groton Open Space Association, Avalonia Land Conservancy and the Ledyard Garden Club.

Members: $5

Non-members: $10

Reservations: 860.443.2545 x129 or email us.

The Lyman Allyn Art Museum Acquires Tiffany Stained Glass Window

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

THE LYMAN ALLYN ART MUSEUM ACQUIRES TIFFANY STAINED GLASS WINDOW

October 15, 2014
Lyman Allyn Art Museum
Press Contact: Rebecca Marsie, Communications Coordinator
860.443.2545 x112 / marsie@lymanallyn.org

Come Unto Me,photo courtesy of Robert Baldwin, collection of Lyman Allyn Art Museum
Louis Comfort Tiffany, New York, Come Unto Me, 1924, Favrile glass; 72” x 76” , photo courtesy of Robert Baldwin

New London – The Lyman Allyn Art Museum is delighted to announce the acquisition of a magnificent stained-glass window created by the renowned Tiffany Studios in New York. In 1924, Come Unto Me was installed above the pulpit in the All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church of New London, CT and was dedicated to the memory of Anna Chaplin Rumrill, a member of that congregation. This exquisite work of art depicts a beatific Jesus standing with outstretched arms in the foreground of a lustrous landscape with mountains, a lake, and cypress trees. The large window (72” tall x 76” wide) is signed by Louis Comfort Tiffany and composed entirely of Favrile glass.

On October 9th, 2014, the Board of the All Souls Congregation agreed to sell the Tiffany window to the Lyman Allyn Art Museum. By accepting the Museum’s offer, the Congregation ensures that the prized window remains on public view in New London.

[Read more…]